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The 3 Main Causes of Shadowing in Dementia Patients

Shadowing is a term heard frequently in the memory care community for when a senior citizen displays clingy behavior to a loved one or caretaker. There are many reasons your loved one may be shadowing you, but her are three main causes.

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The Effects of Sundowning in the Wake of Daylight Savings

Daylight savings time can affect even the healthiest of individuals, but for those suffering from memory issues, less daylight and a changing one’s daily schedule can bring on sudden emotional and behavioral challenges, often referred to as sundowning.

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3 Tips for Organizing a Dementia-Friendly Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is an opportunity to connect with family and friends, share a meal together, and celebrate the holiday season. If you plan on celebrating Thanksgiving with a loved one experiencing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, consider implementing these three tips for an enjoyable, stress-free day.

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The Benefits of Enjoying Classic Films with Your Loved Ones Experiencing Dementia

Watching classic movies with your elderly loved ones can help improve memory care by stimulating their mind, triggering old memories, and creating opportunities for socialization.

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Three Tips to Prepare for Colder Weather

It’s officially the fall season and for our elderly loved ones, maintaining a healthy body temperature is paramount to their wellbeing. Here are three major tips to share with our elderly loved ones to ensure they are warm and healthy at home in preparation for the changing seasons.

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Protecting Against Elder Scams

While our elderly loved ones may spend less time on the internet than the rest of the general public, they are still targets for cybercrimes and other scams. Identity theft, Medicare fraud, or financial scams by strangers or close acquaintances can go unnoticed by seniors with little to no online experience.

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Day-to-Day Tips for Caretakers

Caretaking styles will evolve over time as the memory issues progress and behaviors change. It may be hard for your loved one to admit they need help or to accept help, but there are a few tips to keep in mind to ease the way as a family caregiver.

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Learning to Listen

Learning to listen more carefully will give your loved one the space and time they need to communicate their wants and needs to you.

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Communicating With Body Language

Communication can become difficult for individuals as Alzheimer’s disease or dementia progresses, but communication is more than just verbal interaction. Allow your loved ones with dementia to maintain their sense of independence by providing additional signals of communication with your body language.

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Encouraging Comfortable Communication

Communication can help people with dementia sustain relationships and maintain their sense of independence. Your loved one’s ability to reason clearly and present rational ideas may lessen, but there are many ways you can help them continue to cultivate meaningful conversation.

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Staying Hydrated During the Summer

Staying hydrated is important to keeping your body functioning correctly. Keeping track of your water intake can prevent a variety of physical and mental issues.

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Seasonal Allergies & How to Fight Them

Warmer weather brings us outside more often, but allergies can send us right back in. Learn how to relieve the worst of your symptoms this pollen seaso.

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Legal Steps to Take Today to Prepare for Tomorrow

Prepare for tomorrow by taking the time you have now to create clear and concise documentation for future legal decisions and informing your family members of where they can find those documents when necessary.

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Designating Your Trusted Decision-Makers

Plan for your future by identifying key decision-makers in your life who you trust the most. Take the time to document your choices in writing and open a dialogue to discussing the details with your loved ones.

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Key Things to Consider When Organizing Your Finances

Organizing your finances, accounts, and assets now can help your family navigate the future according to your interests and preferences. This can be especially useful to your loved ones if you need assistance with decision-making due to Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia.

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7 Key Questions You Should Answer For Your Family

Planning ahead can make all the difference when it comes to determining your future. Despite the uncertainty that comes with aging, there are some clear preferences you can choose to communicate with your loved ones now so they can ensure your wishes are carried out properly later.

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Aging or Alzheimer’s? How to Spot the Difference

Memory issues can be a sign of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, but are also a common side effect of aging. It may not always be easy to differentiate between what’s normal and what’s not.

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What You’re Thinking Can Affect Your Health: 5 Ways to Feel More Positive

Did you know that your attitude can affect your physical health? Positive thinking has been shown to increase energy levels and better quality of sleep; improve psychological health and lower your chances of developing depression; and support effective coping skills for managing stress, anxiety, and anger.

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5 Daily Habits to Strengthen Your Brain

It’s never too early to start strengthening your brain. Engaging your mind, memory, and problem-solving skills on multiple levels can help decrease your risk of developing dementia later on.

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10 Mood Boosting Activities to Kick off the New Year

With the holidays now in the rearview mirror, it’s not uncommon to feel a dip in energy or experience the winter blues. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) can affect individuals of any age, but SAD can often be overlooked for seniors with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease since many of the symptoms overlap.

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Appreciating the Present

Memory care often involves quite a bit of planning and thinking ahead. It is not uncommon for caretakers and family members to feel overwhelmed by all of the moving parts, but taking the time to appreciate the present can make all of the difference – for you, for your loved one, and for your entire family.

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Can Family History and Lifestyle Habits Affect Your Chances of Developing Dementia?

There are a few risk factors involving family history and lifestyle habits that may make you more predisposed to developing Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Memory issues are frequently a natural side effect of aging, but severe memory issues and mental decline that disrupt daily life could be signs of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Take the time to review family medical records and consider your lifestyle habits to prepare for the future.

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Finding The Best Fit For Memory Care

When you and your family begin to notice increased signs of a loved one’s memory issues, it may be time to start thinking about professional care. Researching memory care communities ahead of time allows you and your family the luxury of finding the best option for your unique needs. Proactively exploring senior living options will make it easier for you, your family, and the person needing memory care when the time is right.

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Finding Balance Between Health and Tradition

Navigating the holiday season can be tricky, especially with loved ones who experience Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. Here is a roundup of our past blog articles to help you find a safe balance between health and tradition this holiday season.

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When a Fall is Unavoidable: Strategies for Falling More Safely

Learning to fall is a valuable lesson for people of all ages to learn, but it’s particularly helpful as we age and begin experiencing muscle weakness and balance issues. Strength and balance can be impacted by illness or physical conditions, but can also be a side effect of certain medications or a sudden startle. Taking the time to teach yourself how to fall more safely may be the difference between a small bruise and a permanent injury.

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Preventive Measures To Decrease Your Risk of Falling

There are many changes that occur as we age, such as poor eyesight, decreased hearing, and muscle weakness, which can increase your risk of falling and injuring yourself. As you notice these changes, there are preventative measures you can take to increase your safety and reduce fall risk.

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8 Tips to Staying Healthy During Cold and Flu Season

Fall has officially arrived! Unfortunately, so has the start of the cold and flu season. Don’t let a stuffed up nose stop you from enjoying the autumn season with these eight tips for healthy living.

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Goodbye Summer, Hello Fall: Preparing for the Change of Weather

The third week of September brings the first day of fall! With autumn’s arrival comes the change in weather, anticipation for approaching holidays, and opportunities to enjoy fall activities with family and friends. In the academic calendar, fall also signifies the start of a new school year, a fresh start to get back into a routine as we wave goodbye to the warm summer weather.

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Fact or Fiction? How Fiblets Differ From Lies

We are taught from an early age not to lie to our parents, but when faced with caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia, fiblets can be a necessary strategy to keep them safe and calm.

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Leading a Healthy Lifestyle

As we age, our nutritional and physical needs begin to shift. Foods we ate when we were younger may not be what our bodies require or crave later on. With Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia, there are already a variety of health concerns to be aware of, but leading a healthy lifestyle can ease your day-to-day routines.

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Stress-Free Guide to Downsizing

Downsizing does not have to be stressful, regardless of whether you are relocating to a smaller home, moving in with family, or choosing senior assisted living. When welcoming new residents to Willow River, here are our tips to make downsizing as stress-free as possible.

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Timing the Transition

When your loved one is living with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia, timing is everything. Transitioning them to a memory care facility can involve lots of change for the entire family. The more prepared and aligned you and your loved ones are in advance, the easier the transition will be.

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A Recipe for Your Relationship: Tapping Into Old Memories Through Food

Food influences people in extraordinary ways. It is often the connector between strong memories and meaningful experiences. Creating food and sharing it with loved ones is a familiar ritual that many individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia find comfort in. Food can help you nurture your relationship with a loved one in the present or assist them in remembering a past experience.

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Stretching Together: Why It’s Important to Keep Moving as We Age

Stretching is important for strength, flexibility, and mobility. No matter your age, adding regular stretch exercises to your daily routine is a healthy choice to keep muscles limber so that you and your loved ones can continue to stay as active as possible.

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Know Your Medical History: Checklist for Documenting Your Loved One’s Information

As we age, it is critical to have an accurate, up-to-date medical history when memory begins to fail. Above all, it makes the process easier for family caregivers taking turns escorting their loved ones with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia to medical appointments.

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Focusing on Single-Minded Tasks For People With Memory Impairment

Single-minded tasks are a great way to assist your loved one living with Alzheimer’s disease as they tackle day-to-day activities. Though the tasks may take longer to complete, your loved one may respond positively to having a sense of control in familiar situations. Take some time to adapt the activities they previously enjoyed, alone or with others, to their individual level of capacity.

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Building Family Support Around a Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or Dementia

A diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease can be hard to accept, both for the diagnosed individual and for their family members. Denial is a normal coping mechanism in the face of change, but acceptance can help get everyone on the same page and work together to help their loved one enjoy the best quality of life for as long as possible.

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Navigating Conversations with Someone Who Has Dementia

Engaging in conversation with a loved one experiencing dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease can present new and unfamiliar challenges. Whether you are visiting in-person, talking on the phone, or video chatting, staying connected and communicating clearly is an important aspect of your relationship.

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Finding Community in Faith

Faith communities can help you navigate grief and loss, especially when experiencing dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease personally, or caring for a loved one with memory issues. Whether you practice a religion or not, your individual faith can be a driving force to keep your mind and body strong during challenging times. Faith communities offer a variety of different benefits for individuals or families to connect with others experiencing similar issues.

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The Benefits of Gardening For People With Memory Impairment

April is National Gardening Month, signalling the start of sunnier days, warmer weather, and new opportunities to get outside. Gardening, whether indoors or out, is a rewarding endeavor that not only encourages physical activity and motor function, but provides an opportunity to connect socially, especially for those living with memory impairment.

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5 Tips to Avoid Seasonal Depression

Following the holiday season, many people, from children to senior citizens, describe feeling “blue” or “flat.” The post-holiday lull is incredibly common as family visits and celebrations come to an end. Occasionally however, these blue feelings can be the result of something more serious: Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

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Showing Your Love: How Little Things Can Mean a Lot for Those Living with Alzheimer’s or Dementia

Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease bring a lot of changes and confusion both for those diagnosed and for their family caregivers. While adjusting to this new reality, caregivers may feel disconnected from their loved one experiencing memory issues. There are many small steps you can take to show your love during this time of uncertainty. Here are three tips for creating a comfortable and loving atmosphere while you both come to terms with the changes that dementia and Alzheimer’s disease bring.

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Engaging Loved Ones With Memory Loss: The Pet Connection

Memories with strong positive emotional influences, such as with a family pet, may be retained more strongly than others. Here are some strategies for using this pet connection to create better days and more meaningful visits.

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Navigating The Grief and Loss of Memory Impairment

The level of grief associated with memory loss, both for the person with the impairment and for the caregivers, can be unexpected. These complicated feelings are valid and should be acknowledged in order to heal. Here are four strategies for coping with the grief associated with a memory impairment diagnosis.

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3 Resolutions to Reduce Caregiver Stress

Family caregivers often balance many roles and responsibilities when caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia. Managing stress effectively can allow you to focus more fully on your relationship with your loved one.

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Senior Living Communities: Move in during COVID-19 or wait?

Here are some of the key reasons why moving into a Senior Living community during COVID-19 may actually be the right option.

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Keeping With Tradition: Strategies for Successful Holidays when a Loved One Has Alzheimer’s or Dementia

Family traditions can be sacred rituals around the holiday season. When a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia starts to forget those traditions it may be time to downsize and focus on the ones that really matter. Here are six tips to create an atmosphere of joy for the entire family.

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Celebrating the Holidays During a Pandemic in 5 Easy Steps

Holidays with the family may look different this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still find rewarding ways to share the season with loved ones with Alzheimer’s or dementia.

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Preparing for Visits with Loved Ones in Memory Care

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia can be challenging in a variety of ways, but regular visits can nurture your relationship and improve their mood. By planning ahead and following these strategies, you can create more positive and rewarding visits. Here are a few key tips to ensure positive and enjoyable visits.

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Why Moving to a Memory Care Community is the Right Choice

If your loved one has a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or dementia or is showing signs of memory loss that may go beyond normal aging, it’s time to start considering memory care. It can be tempting to try to provide care yourself, but memory care communities offer significant advantages. Families can focus on quality time instead […]

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5 Signs To Look for to Know it’s Time for Memory Care

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or other memory problems at home can be challenging. Deciding when to look into memory care is unique to every individual and family, but there are 5 main signs to look for to know when it might be the right time for professional memory care. Daily schedules […]

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